Tuesday, January 12, 2010

The Creator Gods

In Omni histories, the Three Creator gods, were helpers in the creation of the Earth and the Universe, and specifically helped create humankind.



ENKI

Enki was a god in Sumerian religion, later known as Ea in Akkadian and Babylonian texts. He was originally patron god of the city of Eridu, but later the influence of his cult spread throughout Mesopotamia and to the Hittites and Hurrians. He was the deity of crafts; water, seawater, and lakewater; intelligence and creation, He was assimilated to the zenith in the Sun's path at the winter solstice.

The exact meaning of his name is uncertain: the common translation is "Lord of the Earth": the Sumerian en is translated as a title equivalent to "lord"; it was originally a title given to the High Priest; ki means "earth"; but there are theories that ki in this name has another origin, possibly kig of unknown meaning, or kur meaning "mound". The name Ea is allegedly Hurrian in origin while others claim that it is possibly of Semitic origin and may be a derivation from the West-Semitic root *hyy meaning "life" in this case used for "spring", "running water." In Sumerian E-A means "the house of water", and it has been suggested that this was originally the name for the shrine to the God at Eridu.

Early royal inscriptions from the third millennium BCE mention "the reeds of Enki". Reeds were an important local building material, used for baskets and containers, and collected outside the city walls, where the dead or sick were often carried.
This links Enki to the Kur or underworld of Sumerian mythology. In another even older tradition, Nammu, the goddess of the primeval creative matter and the mother-goddess portrayed as having "given birth to the great gods," was the mother of Enki, and as the watery creative force, was said to preexist Ea-Enki. Benito states "With Enki it is an interesting change of gender symbolism, the fertilising agent is also water, Sumerian "a" which also means "semen". In one evocative passage in a Sumerian hymn, Enki stands at the empty riverbeds and fills them with his 'water'". This may be a reference to Enki's hieros gamos or sacred marriage with Ki/Ninhursag (the Earth).

Enki was not perfect, as god of water he had a penchant for beer and as god of semen he had a string of incestuous affairs. In the epic Enki and Ninhursag, he and his consort Ninhursag had a daughter Ninsar. When Ninhursag left him he came upon Ninsar (Lady Greenery) and then had intercourse with her. Ninhursa then gave birth to Ninkurra (Lady Fruitfulness or Lady Pasture).
A second time, he had intercourse with Ninkurra, who gave birth to Uttu (weaver or spider).
A third time Enki succumbs to temptation, and attempts seduction of Uttu. Upset about Enki's reputation, Uttu consults Ninhursag, who, upset at the promiscuous nature of her spouse, advises Uttu to avoid the riverbanks. In another version of this myth Ninhursag takes Enki's semen from Uttu's womb and plants it in the earth where seven plants rapidly germinate. With his two-faced servant and steward Isimud, Enki finds the plants and immediately starts consuming their fruit. Consuming his own semen he falls pregnant (ill with swellings) in his jaw, his teeth, his mouth, his throat, his limbs and his rib. The gods are at a loss to know what to do, as Enki lacks a womb with which to give birth, until Ninhursag's sacred fox fetches the goddess.
Ninhursag relents and takes Enki's Ab (water, or semen) into her body, and gives birth to gods of healing of each part of the body. The last one, Ninti (Lady Rib), is also a pun on Lady Life, a title of Ninhursag herself. The story symbolically reflects the way in which life is brought forth through the addition of water to the land, and once it grows, water is required to bring plants to fruit. It also counsels balance and responsibility, nothing to excess.
Ninti, is given the title of the mother of all living, and was a title given to the later Hurrian goddess Kheba. This is also the title given to Eve, the Hebrew Khavvah (חוה), the Aramaic Hawwah, who was supposedly made from the rib of Adam, in a strange reflection of the Sumerian myth.

What we know about Enki is mostly from ancient Sacred Texts, along with vague memory and recordings from previous incarnations. We do know, that as one of the Three Creator Gods, as we so dubed them, he is in the seat which is 'above' the Triad member, She-Ma. She does not nessecarily take orders from him, though much of her power comes from him.


ENLIL

"Lord of the Open" or "Lord of the Wind" was the name of a chief deity listed and written about in ancient Sumerian, Akkadian, Hittite, Canaanite and other Mesopotamian clay and stone tablets. The name is perhaps pronounced and sometimes rendered in translations as Ellil in later Akkadian, Hittite, and Canaanite literature.
Enlil was considered to be the god of breath, wind, loft, and breadth.
One story names his origins as the exhausted breath of An (god of the heavens) and Ki (goddess of the Earth) after sexual union.
When Enlil was a young god, he was banished from Dilmun, home of the gods, to Kur, the underworld for raping a girl named Ninlil. Ninlil followed him to the underworld where she bore his first child, Nergal, and/or the moon god Sin (Sumerian Nanna/Suen). After fathering three more underworld deities (subtitutes for Sin), Enlil was allowed to return to Dilmun.
Enlil is associated with the ancient city of Nippur, sometimes referred to as the cult city of Enlil.
His temple was named Ekur, "House of the Mountain, Enlil was assimilated to the north "Pole of the Ecliptic". His sacred number name was 50.
Enlil was also the God of weather. According to the Sumerians, Enlil helped create the humans, but then got tired of their noise and tried to kill them by sending a flood. A mortal known as Utanapistim survived the flood through the help of another god, Ea, and he was made immortal by Enlil after Enlil's initial fury.

In our stories Enlil is a prominent figure. In many realms we remember, he was worshiped even by this name, and many sacred places were named after him. But once again, we know very little about him besides vague memory and record in this realm. We do know that his seat is directly over the Triad member Raven of the Tower. She does not nesscarily take orders from him, but gets much of her power from him.

ANU
In Sumerian mythology and later for Assyrians and Babylonians, Anu (also An; (from Sumerian *An = sky, heaven)) was a sky-god, the god of heaven, lord of constellations, king of gods, spirits and demons, and dwelt in the highest heavenly regions. It was believed that he had the power to judge those who had committed crimes, and that he had created the stars as soldiers to destroy the wicked. His attribute was the royal tiara, most times decorated with two pairs of bull horns.

Even though he is generally looked upon as a male deity, many cultures believed him to be female, and some believed him to be a hermaphodite.
e was one of the oldest gods in the Sumerian pantheon, and part of a triad including Enlil, god of the sky and Enki, god of water. He was called Anu by the Akkadians. By virtue of being the first figure in a triad consisting of Anu, Enlil, and Ea, Anu came to be regarded as the father and at first, king of the gods. Anu is so prominently associated with the E-anna temple in the city of Uruk (biblical Erech) in southern Babylonia that there are good reasons for believing this place to have been the original seat of the Anu cult. If this is correct, then the goddess Inanna (or Ishtar) of Uruk may at one time have been his consort.
Anu had several consorts, the foremost being Ki (earth), Nammu, and Uras. By Ki he was the father of, among others, the Annuna gods. By Nammu he was the father of, among others, Enki and Ningikuga. By Uras he was the father of Nin'insinna. According to legends, heaven and earth were once inseparable until An and Ki bore Enlil, god of the air, who cleaved heaven and earth in two. An and Ki were, in some texts, identified as brother and sister being the children of Anshar and Kishar. Ki later developed into the Akkadian goddess Antu.


Anu is probably the most prominent of the three figures in Omni history. He seems to communicate more with those of us over the years of war, and is worshipped in more cultures and realms than any other god I can think of. We also know that he is the head figure, holding the seat above the Triad member, Siva, which strangely enough has also been described in scripture as a hermaphrodite.

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